Attractions

We have everthing a visitor to the area could want, whatever the season! Wander through our scenic backroads and chaming villages, plan a cycling trip, pack a leisurely lunch,  fishing, hunting, swimming,
skiing, photography, 
golf, bird watching or check out one or more of the attractions below. Whatever your pleasure you'll find both fun and relaxation and lots of friendly people in the Great Falls Region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Mountain Railroad

1 Railway Lane

Burlington, VT 05401

800-707-3530

www.rails-vt.com

Scenic Vermont train rides. 

Adams Grist Mill Museum

Mill Street

Bellows Falls, VT 05101

802-376-6789

https://www.facebook.com/BellowsFallsHistoricalSociety

Adams Grist Mill Museum, Mill Street, Bellows Falls, VT

The local historical society supervises collections housed in the 1831 stone and wood frame grist mill building, located on Mill Street, at the southern end of the village square. The structure houses much of its original equipment, including all the grain elevators and storage bins. Implements from the Vermont Farm Machinery Company are also stored in the building, as well as household articles, antique signs, and hand tools used by various craftsmen that were there when the business closed in the early 1960s, and the original sleigh for the mill, as well as the family sleigh, all belonging to the Adams family. The society's collection of archival materials of Bellows Falls memorabilia is temporarily housed in the Rockingham Free Public Library. The society's collection of Hetty Green furnishings is on exhibit in the Library Museum.

Hours and Admission: Memorial Day - Columbus Day: Saturday and Sunday and by appointment.

Rockingham Meeting House

103 Off VT

Bellows Falls, VT 

802-463-3456

http://www.rockbf.org/

Rockingham Meeting House - A National Historical Landmark
Constructed 1787-1801
The Rockingham Meeting House is the oldest public building in Vermont that still exists in a condition close to its original state. The Meeting House was built between 1787 and 1801. To serve the needs of religious services and civic events in the town of Rockingham, whose first focus of settlement had been in the village immediately surrounding it. The town expected to expand rapidly and planned a meeting house large enough to meet its needs.
As time went on, settement in the town shifted to Bellows Falls and Saxtons River, while the village of Rockingham remained small and rural. The Congregational church which used the Meeting House for its services survived only until 1839, and annual Town Meetins continued to be held here until 1869.  

http://www.rockbf.org/vertical/Sites/%7B6B964307-B78B-4D8D-8C7F-8D587328...

Petroglyphs

Bridge St

Bellows Falls, VT 05101

Bellows Falls Petroglyph Site
What is a Petroglyph, Anyway?
Petroglyphs or ancient carvings in rock were left by native Americans centuries ago, here in the massisve rock
ledges of the Connectitcut River. What do they mean? Perhaps they signify a successful hunt, a battle or 
celebration. Or perhaps they are tribute to an awe-inspiring area of great natural beauty- a place we know as
Bellows Falls. For more information click on the link below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellows_Falls_Petroglyph_Site

TransCanada Bellows Falls Visitor Center

17 Bridge St

Bellows Falls , VT 05101

The Nature Musuems operate the Visitor Center on behalf of TransCanada Corporation
owerner of the fish ladder. Open Memorial Day - Labor Day Friday, Saturday and Sunday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Click on the link below for more information
http://www.nature-museum.org/transcanada-bellow-falls-visitor-center/

Bellows Falls Canal

Canal St

Bellows Falls, VT 05101

 

The Connecticut was the first major river in the country to be improved for travel, with about 250 miles open to navigation by 1810. Constructed between 1791 and 1802, this canal was among the first in America and was a major influence on the growth of the village because it also provided power for many mills. Produce and lumber were brought downriver on flat-bottomed boats propelled with long poles, square sails, and the current. Here, avoiding the river gorge, boats passed through eight locks with a total elevation of 52 feet. The coming of railroads in the 1840s brought the era of slower canal boats to an end, but this canal, enlarged several times since, now serves modern need.